Mathematical Methods in Cancer Biology, Evolution and Therapy (21w5102)

Organizers

(the Francis Crick Institute)

(University of Toronto)

(Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center)

Wenyi Wang (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)

Description

The Institute for Advanced Study in Mathematics will host the "Mathematical Methods in Cancer Biology, Evolution and Therapy" workshop in Hangzhou, China from October 24 to October 29, 2021.



Present day biology generates a wealth of data from which tumor biology and tumor evolution can be inferred, and therapeutic strategies can be developed. Most clinical (and research) samples are comprised of a mixture of different cells, including multiple different populations of cancer cells (‘subclones’) and a variety of normal cell types. Effective use of these data thus requires data from individual cell types to be deconvolved. A number of subfields are independently developing mathematical and statistical deconvolution techniques. While at first glance these subfields are largely disparate, there are clear opportunities for synergies to be developed. This workshop will fill this gap by bringing together researchers from several of these fragmented subfields across a wide range of backgrounds (computational biology, mathematics, statistics, computer science, biomedicine, etc.) to provide a synergistic forum for cross-disciplinary learning, discussion and collaboration.

The Institute for Advanced Study in Mathematics (IASM) in Hangzhou, China, and the Banff International Research Station for Mathematical Innovation and Discovery (BIRS) in Banff, are collaborative Canada-US-Mexico ventures that provide an environment for creative interaction as well as the exchange of ideas, knowledge, and methods within the Mathematical Sciences, with related disciplines and with industry. The research station in Banff is supported by Canada's Natural Science and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), Alberta's Advanced Education and Technology, and Mexico's Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT).